Waste Management

Non-governmental organisations in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries have recently expressed concern over waste incineration. The reason being is the European Commission signed an agreement, before the Circular Economy Package of 2015, which could bring the construction of new incineration plants. Additionally, CEE countries were given €5.4 billion to improve waste management between 2014 and 2015, but the issue is that 50% of the funds were intended to be distributed to incineration facilities/thermal treatment.

Energy Efficiency and Renewables conference - South-East Europe plays an important role in the transition towards the low carbon economy.  This event brings business and experts together with stakeholders in Bulgaria, Romania and the neighbour regions who are engaged in energy efficiency and renewables from the public and private sectors. With the EU focus on heating and cooling in 2016 this event will provide an insight into emerging schemes for innovation in adapting the region’s building stock in the years to come.

The Italian parliament has started work on a legislative proposal tabled by MP Alessandro Mazzoli, which proposes an overhaul of waste and recycling legislation. The proposal includes a major focus on separate waste collection.

The “zero waste” law that the parliament’s environment committee began discussing on Wednesday calls for 90% separate collection and 85% recycling of urban waste by 2020.

It would also set a 50% waste reduction target for 2050 relative to 2000. The main focus of the proposal is to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill.

The Italian parliament has started work on a legislative proposal tabled by MP Alessandro Mazzoli, which proposes an overhaul of waste and recycling legislation. The proposal includes a major focus on separate waste collection.

The “zero waste” law that the parliament’s environment committee began discussing on Wednesday calls for 90% separate collection and 85% recycling of urban waste by 2020.

It would also set a 50% waste reduction target for 2050 relative to 2000. The main focus of the proposal is to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill.

Denmark has named food waste, construction, clothes, waste electronic equipment and packaging as the five priorities of its first waste prevention strategy.

The €3.3m three-year plan launched this week sets out 72 initiatives under the abovementioned headings.

The initiatives include a climate ministry plan to create a tool to calculate the life-cycle cost of buildings, and a partnership between firms and the authorities on preventing construction waste, which will identity barriers and common solutions and carry out demonstration projects.

Recycling targets under new proposals on the circular economy should be “more realistic” waste companies have warned.

Industry representatives of the waste management sector gathered at the UK Foodservice Packaging Association’s annual seminar last week and raised concerns that new recycling targets would see quantity usurp quality.

William Neale, the former cabinet member for Janez Potočnik met with ENEP members during a General Assembly side event visit to the European Commission recently.  In reviewing the last five years Mr Neale underlined the core pillar of the Potočnik mandate being to “Live well within the limits of the planet”

At the core of its Circular Economy package announced last week, the European Commission has confirmed on the 2nd July that it wants the EU to recycle 70% of all municipal waste by 2030 and ban landfilling of recyclable materials including plastics, paper, metals, glass and biodegradable waste by 2025.

Cornellà de Llobregat, Spain (88,740 inhabitants) organised a campaign “Cornellà takes advantage of the food” (2011) to avoid food waste. It had two different parts. One addressed to citizenship, and the other was the creation of a micro-network to collect food surpluses from some supermarkets and a local market to be distributed to local people in need. In 2012 the Project was extended with the creation of the “Solidary Store” to supply food leftovers to 600 beneficiary families identified by the social services.

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